Service Level Agreement Escalation Procedures

SLAs are a critical component of any outsourcing and technology provider contract. Beyond the list of expectations for the type and quality of service, an SLA can remedy non-compliance. If there is no state transfer associated with an escalation level, you should always consider notifying managers and supervisors. The climbing calendar shows the history of the climbs pulled as well as all the planned climbs in chronological order. The first rule defines the initial escalation, which must be related to a field of problems. The second rule defines the repetition interval of the escalation. Typically, these processes and methods are left to the outsourcing company to ensure that such processes and methods can support the SLA agreement. The escalation rule is anchored in the “End Date” field and the offset is called in the “Estimated hours” field: if the anchor field of a climb rule contains no value, the escalation rule of that problem is ignored. Escalation allows trackers to be configured so that issues that meet custom escalation criteria, i.e. issues that require additional attention, can be automatically marked to make them more visible in time.

The conditions under which escalation is triggered and the resulting actions are defined by the user. Most service providers have standard SLAs – sometimes several that reflect different levels of service at different prices – which can be a good starting point for negotiations. . . .